Movie Adapation

When I think about my favourite books, there is hardly anything of which I am sure that it has not been adapted into a movie before. In fact, it happens quite often that I read a book only after I saw the movie. But last Christmas I found something which I would like to see adapted. I was looking for a present for my stepfather who enjoys criminal novels set in Northern Germany (it’s a trend here currently). Browsing the bookstore I came across Cay Rademacher. He has some stories taking place in Hamburg right after WWII. I bought one as a present and one for me.

‘Der Schieber’ (English: The Trafficker), part 2 of a series of cases superintendent Frank Stave is confronted with, is the book I’d like to see adapted in a movie. Some refugee kids are killed and he is doing his job. Some personal conflicts added, he has an affair and is waiting for his son to come back from war captivity in Russia, and there you are with the average plot. Why I’d like to see it adapted, though, is that in the time it plays, late 40ies of the 20th century, Stave is walking through the whole city. Walking. No public transport, only the British soldiers  of high ranks occupying the city have cars. Or gas, rather. So Stave walks through the city and Rademacher describes in detail what he sees. And that’s the part I’d like to see in a movie. There are many movies playing during the war, and that’s bad enough. But of the time right after, when houses and systems were still down while people tried to get back to normal life, we rarely speak. And if, then maybe about the time ten years later or so, when the worst was over.

It also reminds me of my Granny who was working for the Americans when they occupied parts of Germany. I only exist because she turned down a job offer in the United States and instead went back home to Schleswig-Holstein, the most beautiful place in the world, only to meet my Granddad.

*sigh*

Natalie

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